Plate Tectonics - SOS Playlist

Introduction

paleogeographic.jpg Paleographic Maps

The paleogeographic maps are arranged into several series that show how Earth or regions of the Earth may have appeared at various increments of time ("time slices").

Age of Seafloor with Shaded Vegetation and 20my Contours: http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=119

rt_earthquake_sm.jpg Real-time Global Earthquakes

This real-time dataset shows the earthquakes that daily happen around the world that are greater than 2.5 on the Richter scale. This dataset is updated hourly.

Cumulative Earthquake Activity: 1980-1995
http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=107

Volcano Locations Globally
http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=108

Paleoportal.jpgLife Through Time Exhibit

The evolution of life on Earth over 3+ billion years is documented by over 300 images of fossils in the HSU Natural History Museum. The fossils are arranged by geologic period and supplemented with tectonic maps, historic engravings etc.

Future Paleo Animation: How our Earth will look in the Future

Earth's landmasses were not always what they are today. Continents formed as Earth's crustal plates shifted and collided over long periods of time. This video shows how today's continents are thought to have evolved over the last 600 million years, and where they'll end up in the next 100 million years.
Paleogeographic Views of Earth's History provided by Ron Blakey, Professor of Geology, Northern Arizona University.

Continents in Collision: Pangea Ultima

The Earth is going to be a very different place 250 million years from now. Africa is going to smash into Europe as Australia migrates north to merge with Asia. Meanwhile the Atlantic Ocean will probably widen for a spell before it reverses course and later disappears.
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Related Resources
UCMP - University of California Museum of Paleontology - Pictures, descriptions of geology, evolution, animal life.


 

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